(FAMOUS DOGS/ROYAL CORGIS) Queen Elizabeth II is in mourning following the recent death of one of her beloved corgis. Holly, the 13-year-old prestigious pup, was one of the two remaining Welsh corgis in the Royal family.

The dignified dog had to be put down after suffering from an illness, and was buried last week in the garden at Balmoral Castle in Scotland, in a spot that the Queen can see from her drawing room window.

olly, Willow, Vulcan, Candy—and The Queen. Read more about the exclusive Annie Leibovitz portrait honoring the Queen on her 90th birthday Photo Credit: Vanity Fair
Annie Leibovitz’s 2016 Vanity Fair portrait honors the Queen on her 90th birthday .Photo Credit: Vanity Fair

According to an insider:

“The Queen was deeply upset but she doesn’t like seeing her dogs suffer and Holly had reached a very good age…She gets more unsettled if they are distressed and she knows that putting a dog down is often the kindest solution.”

“She was devoted to Holly and wherever the Queen was, the dog was never far behind.”

Holly’s last public appearances included the James Bond sketch at the Opening Ceremonies of London’s 2012 Olympics (see video clip below) and Annie Leibovitz’s 2016 portraits of the Royal family featured in Vanity Fair.

The Queen is now left with only one remaining Welsh corgi named Willow, and two dorgis—a corgi and dachshund mix—named Vulcan and Candy.

Over the years, corgis have become synonymous with the Queen as she’s had over 30 corgi companions during her reign.

She’s cared for the dogs for so long that you can’t imagine a Queen of England without a corgi by her side.

Queen Elizabeth II on the steps of the East Terrace at Windsor Castle with corgi Willow, dorgi Vulcan, corgi Holly, and dorgi Candy, in April. Photo Credit: Annie Leibovitz
Queen Elizabeth II on the steps of the East Terrace at Windsor Castle with corgi Willow, dorgi Vulcan, corgi Holly, and dorgi Candy, in April. Photo Credit: Annie Leibovitz

In fact, at the peak of the Queen’s dog pack, there were as many as 13 of the highborn hounds in Buckingham Palace.

Regardless, she’s decided not to replace any of the elderly dogs as they die off, out of concerns of tripping over younger, sprightly pups as they run around her feet, and in fear of leaving them behind when she eventually passes away.

In 2015, Monty Roberts, one of the Queen’s advisers who occasionally weighs in on dog-related matters, urged her to get a new corgi after the death of her dog Monty (named after Roberts) in 2012, but she was hesitant.

“[S]he didn’t want to have any more young dogs. She didn’t want to leave any young dog behind. She wanted to put an end to it,” Roberts said.

Losing a pet is never easy. After all, they are like family members to loving pet parents.

Our deepest condolences go out to Queen Elizabeth and the rest of the Royal family during this difficult time. Holly is dearly missed, and her memory will live on forever.

— Alisa Manzelli, Global Animal

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