TOP NEWS

10 Worst Zoos For Elephants Exposed

(ZOOS/ANIMAL WELFARE) In Defense of Animals has released its annual list of the ten worst zoos for elephants in North America. The respected list exposes the shocking hidden suffering of captive elephants, including premature deaths, brutal breeding procedures, and flagrant violations of the Animal Welfare Act. To some degree, 2017 was a banner year for wild and captive elephants. At least 44 zoos around the globe, including 29 in the U.S. alone, have closed their elephant exhibits for good, while Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus famously folded up their tents for the very last time. What's more, legislations banning the use of elephants for entertainment are gaining momentum, and were passed in Illinois and New York. But there's still a lot of work to be done to end elephant abuse and exploitation. While performing elephants are becoming a thing of the past, elephants in zoos are still being cruelly exploited and subjected to battering bullhooks, inadequate living conditions, captivity-induced health problems, unnaturally cold climates, debilitating isolation, and sexually abusive breeding programs that do nothing to further the conservation of this ecologically vital species. As the zoo industry desperately tries to cling onto any shred of remaining credibility, the simple truth is elephant lifespans are shorter in captivity than in the wild--even when droughts and poaching are taken into account. Read on to learn more about the worst zoos for elephants in North America, and raise your voice to help end elephant cruelty and captivity by sending a message for elephants. -- Global Animal

UPDATE: Ringleader State Falls Short Of Becoming The First To Ban Exotic Animal Circus Acts

(ANIMAL NEWS/CIRCUSES) After overwhelmingly sweeping the Senate by a vote of 31-0, New Jersey now leads as the first U.S. state to ban traveling wild animal acts. Last year, Illinois and New York similarly banned all traveling acts with elephants, but New Jersey is the first to prohibit all wild or exotic animals in traveling shows. Circuses have been on the decline ever since Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey folded its tents for good in May of last year. As audiences turn away from animal circuses in droves, a number of jurisdictions are considering bans on wild animal circus acts--including a federal bill called the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act. First introduced as “Nosey’s Law," named after an abused circus elephant whose freedom has been the focus of a bitter public lawsuit, the legislation is not the first of its kind and it certainly won't be the last. Read on to learn more about the new law, which activists say has been a long time coming. -- Global Animal

TODAY'S CUTE ATTACK

PET CARE

OCEANS

SKIES