(ANIMAL PICTURES/BUTTERFLIES) Springtime is here, and along with the beautiful weather it brings…butterflies!

Feast your eyes on this photo gallery of amazing winged beauties–from the most common to the rarest of butterfly species.

These wonderful photos are sure to make you float like a butterfly, or at least stop and smell the roses! — Global Animal

A Glasswing Butterfly feeds on nectar from a plant flower. Photo Credit: Stock Photo
A Glasswing Butterfly feeds on nectar from a plant flower. Photo Credit: Stock Photo

 

Massive migrations of monarch butterflies along the California-Mexico coast can take these airborne insects over 3,000 miles (4,828 kilometers). Photo Credit: Hope Ryden

 

Giant Blue Butterfly Bolivia
Butterfly and Trees, Madidi National Park, Bolivia. Photo Credit: Joel Sartore, National Geographic

 

A Monarch butterfly drinks nectar from purple flowers. Photo Credit: Stock Photo
A Monarch butterfly drinks nectar from purple flowers. Photo Credit: Stock Photo

 

Beautiful Eighty Eight Brazilian Butterfly
A neglected eighty-eight butterfly (Diaethria neglecta) in Brazil’s Pantanal displays the design of lines and dots that gave it its unusual common name. Photo Credit: Joel Sartore

 

Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly
Colorful gerbera daisies highlight the rich coloration of a spicebush swallowtail butterfly (Papilio troilus). Photo Credit: Darlyne A. Murawski

 

Blue Morpho Butterfly
A close-up photo of a male blue Morpho butterfly. Photo Credit: Cary Wolinsky

 

Birdwing Butterfly
Australia’s largest butterfly, the birdwing (Ornithoptera priamus) blends into a green leaf. Female birdwings can have a wingspan of nearly 8 inches (20 centimeters). Photo Credit: Nicole Duplaix

 

Peacock Pansy Orange Butterfly
The peacock pansy butterfly (Junionia almana) sports striking eyespots and purple patterns. Photo Credit: Tim Laman

 

Millions of monarch butterflies travel to ancestral winter roosts in Mexico’s shrinking mountain fir forests. Surfing winds from southern Canada and the northern U.S., they travel thousands of miles, taking directional cues from the sun. Photo Credit: Joel Sartore, National Geographic

 

Birdwing Butterfly
A captive birdwing butterfly lands on a pink flower. Photo Credit: Roy Toft/National Geographic/Getty Images

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