(PETS/BIRDS) Not all birds would make good pets, so when looking for a feathery addition to your family make sure you read up on this helpful information from the Humane Society.

Read on to learn which birds make good pets, and which birds should be left in the wild. — Global Animal

While some people like to keep parrots as pets, these birds are still wild animals, even when bred in captivity. Photo Credit: YouTube

The Humane Society of the United States

When deciding to add a feathered friend to your family, it’s important to select a bird whose needs can be met in your home.

Many birds, though popular and readily available, are not appropriate pets for most people. There are several species of birds with physical, behavioral, and social needs that are simply too great to be addressed in an average household. These birds should not be pets and are best left in their natural habitats.

Good choices

Choosing the right pet bird is not as easy as it seems. Photo Credit: HSUS

Canaries, finches, cockatiels, parakeets, and lovebirds are birds who have a long history of selective breeding in captivity and can be considered domesticated strains of wild species. Their basic needs are more easily met, proper supplies to care for them are readily available, and these birds can live long, happy lives in a caring home.

Better kept in the wild

In comparison, birds like conures, parrots (of whom there are many varieties), macaws, cockatoos, and toucans are problematic because they have not undergone the same process of long captive breeding and genetic selection. These birds are still wild animals, even when bred in captivity. As such, their normal behavior can make them difficult and demanding to live with.

Issues like size, noise, destructive behavior, biting, and behavioral vices—coupled with a lifespan of 50 years or more—can make these species inappropriate as pets for the average owner. Because of these humane reasons, these animals are not recommended as pets. Most people simply cannot provide for the many complex needs of such birds, causing them to suffer for their entire lives.

Don’t support cruelty

Another reason to choose captive-bred domestic strains of bird species is because of the wild animal trade. Despite U.S. laws that prohibit the import of many species of wild-caught birds, millions of birds are still caught every year for the pet trade and sold all over the world in pet stores or online.

The commercial trade in wild animals is a multi-billion dollar business that threatens the survival of many different species and results in the inhumane treatment of billions of animals every year. While your local pet store may be full of colorful birds, those creatures represent just a tiny fraction of the captured wild animals who did not survive the process.

Where to get a feathered friend

If you decide that you would like to get a bird, check with your local animal shelter before getting one from a pet store, the Internet, or a classified ad in the newspaper. Many shelters today are not limited to just dogs and cats and have plenty of birds who are looking for new homes. Go to Pets911.com or PetFinder.com to search for adoptable birds at animal shelters and bird rescue groups in your area.

More Humane Society: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/pet_birds/tips/choosing_pet_bird.html

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Conures, macaws, cockatoos, lovebirds, cockatiels, and parakeets (by which they probably mean budgies) are all parrots.  The ones that have been “domesticated” have been bred for color mutations rather than ability to get along with people; effectively, none of them are domesticated.

  2. Conures, macaws, cockatoos, lovebirds, cockatiels, and parakeets (by which they probably mean budgies) are all parrots.  The ones that have been “domesticated” have been bred for color mutations rather than ability to get along with people; effectively, none of them are domesticated.