(ANIMAL PICTURES/WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY) Sure, X-rays can be used for medical purposes, but have you ever thought to use X-rays as an art form?

Artist Arie van ‘t Riet uses X-ray photography to capture unique photos of animals, pairing them with colorful accents.

Riet claims to “prefer objects of ordinary scenes like a butterfly nearby a flower, a fish in the ocean, a mouse in the field, a haron alongside the riverside, a bird in a tree and so on.”

A duck's beak is bigger than their head. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
Lizards are basically one long spine. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
Lizards have a very long spine. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
Monkeys can be very human-like in appearance sometimes. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
Chickens have really long legs. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
Rays are amazingly complex. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
So are frogs. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet
Apparently chameleons can't always blend in. Photo Credit: Arie van 't Riet

British radiographer and artist Chris Thorn features X-ray pictures as well as pen & ink sketches of wildlife.

Thorn introduces himself on his website:

“I fostered my early interest in the study and form of plants, and wildlife of the British countryside, and set about recording my view of some irresistible subjects aiming to produce contemporary studies of familiar plants, flowers and wildlife creatures.”

I think they offer appeal to nature enthusiasts in both formats, those wanting a reminder of the character of some creatures we share our countryside with, as well as those seeking a deeper insight into the functioning structures normally hidden from our view.”

Bats have extremely slender bones. Photo Credit: Chris Thorn
A painting of a brown hare. Photo Credit: Chris Thorn
"Honesty." Photo Credit: Chris Thorn
A painting of a grey seal and pup. Photo Credit: Chris Thorn
An X-ray image of a daffodil. Photo Credit: Chris Thorn
"Thrust." Photo Credit: Chris Thorn

Smithsonian scientist Sandra J. Raredon’s work was featured at the National Museum of Natural History. She has been making radiographs, or X-ray images, for approximately 25 years. Although she doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist, she’s not surprised to see her work on display in that context.

“I wanted people to see that they’re not only scientific, but they’re beautiful as well,” she told NPR.

Now we know why they're called sawfish. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon
Viper moray. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon
Porcupine fish fit their name. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon
Seahorses look intricate from the inside and out. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon
A longnose batfish. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon
Tropical fish boast long slender bones. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon
A slender snipe eel. Photo Credit: Sandra J. Raredon

— Kayla Newcomer, exclusive to Global Animal

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