(CELEBRITY NEWS/OCEANS) Leonardo DiCaprio proves once again he’s king of the world—especially the oceans.

Last month, the Oscar-nominated star hilariously spoofed himself on Saturday Night Live with his The Wolf of Wall Street co-star Johah Hill.

Leonardo DiCaprio and his "The Wolf of Wall Street" co-star Johah Hill reenacted DiCaprio's famous scene from 'Titanic' when Hill hosted 'Saturday Night Live" last month./Photo credit: nodallynews.com
Leonardo DiCaprio and his The Wolf of Wall Street co-star Johah Hill reenacted DiCaprio’s famous scene from Titanic when Hill hosted ‘Saturday Night Live” last month. Photo credit: nodallynews.com

Now, through his Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, he granted $3 million dollars to Oceana, the largest international advocacy group working on behalf of oceans.

“Protecting our planet’s oceans and the marine species that call it home is one of the most pressing sustainability crises facing humanity today and a moral imperative that we must acknowledge,” DiCaprio said.

Leonardo DiCaprio's foundation granted Oceana $3 million to protect ocean habitat and key species, including sharks, and to go toward the effort to stop drift gillnet fishing in California./Photo credit: David_Shankbone.jpg
Leonardo DiCaprio’s foundation granted Oceana $3 million to protect ocean habitat and key species, and to help stop drift gillnet fishing in California. Photo credit: David_Shankbone.jpg

According to the organization’s website, the Oscar-nominated actor started the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation in 1998 to foster “a harmonious relationship between humanity and the natural world.”

Spread over a three-year period, the foundation’s generous grant will help Oceana protect the ocean’s threatened habitat, including helping to put an end to California’s gillnet industry.

“The foundation and Leo’s support for campaigns like our efforts to ban the drift gillnets in California will help Oceana win more protections for countless sharks and other marine animals and for ocean habitats in the Pacific and Arctic,” said Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless.

Usually a mile-long in diameter, drift gillnets target sword fish and thresher sharks, but because they encompass such a wide area there’s a large amount of collateral damage. Some of the other marine animals that are killed include sperm whales, dolphins, sharks, sea lions, gray whales, and sea turtles.

A rare megamouth shark caught by a drift gillnet vessel along the California Coast./Photo from National Marine Fisheries Service.
A rare megamouth shark caught by a drift gillnet vessel along the California Coast./Photo from National Marine Fisheries Service.

On Thursday, a bill effectively banning the controversial gear for boats operating along the West Coast was introduced by Assembly Democrats.

Supported by the Turtle Island Restoration Network and Oceana, part of DeCaprio’s grant will go toward this effort.

“It’s my hope that this grant will help Oceana continue the tremendous work that they do daily on behalf of our oceans,” The Wolf of Wall Street star said.

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