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All about birds: News, Stories, Facts & Science

A Calcified Flamingo. Photo Credit: Nick Brandt (ANIMAL PICTURES)

World’s Deadliest Lake Turns Animals Into Stone

(WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY/BIRDS) Photographer Nick Brandt recently traveled to the world's deadliest lake, Lake Natron in Northern Tanzania, and discovered a shocking collection of perfectly mummified animal remains. Upon full submersion into the lake, the animals are instantly calcified and perfectly preserved. Take a look at the following photos and read the article below to learn more about Lake Natron's unique properties, the animals who have fallen victim to it's depths, and the few that can actually survive it's deadly waters. — Global Animal
Birds flying in the sky, fly in a V to save energy.

Why A ‘V’ Formation Is For The Birds

(BIRDS/ANIMAL NEWS) Everyone's familiar with the V formation that birds fly in when they travel, but do you know why they choose to fly in a V? Scientists from the Royal Veterinary College in London conducted a study published in the international journal, Nature, and concluded that the V formation is an energy saving way for birds to travel. Continue reading below to find out how birds save energy by flying in a V. — Global Animal

Hair Extensions For Birds? Badly Burned Bird Gets Faux Feather Wings

(ANIMAL RESCUE/BIRDS) A rare Carnaby cockatoo was seriously burned last month after his feathered friend suddenly exploded as they sat on a power line. Luckily for this little survivor, Peter Ricci from the Perth Zoo reconstructed the bird’s feathers using glue and matchsticks in a process called ‘imping.’ While this cockatoo (an endangered species) was severely injured, he is expected to make a full recovery, with hopes of eventually being returned to the wild. Please read on to find out more on this interesting procedure and how it was performed. -- Global Animal

Don’t Be A Bird Brain! What To Feed Your Pet Bird

(BIRDS/PET CARE) Feeding a pet bird isn't as easy as it may seem. Keep your pet healthy, safe, and happy by following these tips on caring for your bird's dietary needs. — Global Animal

Bees Soar Above Computers At Math

(BEES/ANIMAL SCIENCE) Bees vs. Google maps, who will win? A bee, of course! Even though their brains are only the size of grass seeds, bees are able to find the fastest route possible between several flowers, much like a computer can calculate the quickest route to the airport, only bees do it faster. Read on to learn more on how bees are secretly mathematical geniuses. — Global Animal

Eagles Vs. Drones? Dutch Police Devise Deadly Drone Defense System

(EAGLES/MILITARY WORKING ANIMALS) Is it a bird? Is it a plane? It's actually a police-trained eagle taking down an unmanned aerial vehicle. In an attempt to simplify anti-drone defenses, the Dutch National Police Force is currently in the middle of a trial period where eagles are trained to identify, capture, and transport illegally operated drones during emergencies. Although the police force is reportedly testing other electronic and physical solutions, trained eagles are said to offer more control over where captured drones are taken, and are able to hunt down drones in situations where it could be too dangerous to use more common strategies. However, many are saying this is an unfair fight--"pitting flesh and blood against machine"--that puts birds at serious risk of injury, and even death. A statement from PETA reads, "A bird belongs in nature and should never be forced to put his or her life and safety at risk." Wouldn't you agree? Share your thoughts in the comments section below. While it's not confirmed whether the technique will actually be used, authorities will decide upon adopting the program within the next few months. Read on for more on this unusual approach, and view the video below demonstrating the eagle's work. -- Global Animal

10 Tips To Attract Birds To Your Backyard

(BIRDS) If you can fly, you have many options. So, in order to get birds to call your place home rather than your neighbor's, you'll need to roll out the welcome mat. Here are 10 tips to attract hummingbirds and other flying friends to your yard. — Global Animal
Judith Wakelam holding one of the birds that she rehabilitates. Photo credit: Anna Huix for the NY Times

As Free As A Bird: Rescue Birds Swiftly Return To The Wild

(WILDLIFE/BIRDS) Common swifts, a bird known for their long wings and speed, spend most of their lives in flight. This fragile yet agile creature can live for up to 20 years; however, if a baby swift lands on the ground after leaving the nest, the bird will most likely face death. Judith Wakelam, who has committed her life to the bird species, defies acts of nature by rehabilitating hurt baby swifts and releasing them back into the wild. Well-known for her abilities to rehabilitate this gentle bird, Wakelam rescues common swifts from vets, as well as the general public, from all over eastern England. Her talent and dedication prove crucial during the rehabilitation process, and Wakelam accounts how simply nursing a single swift to health can forever change one's outlook on wildlife conservation. Read the beautifully written essay below to enter the minds of animal rehabbers, and discover the wonder behind releasing a captive animal back into its natural home. —Global Animal

Springtime Means Amazing Butterflies! (GALLERY)

(ANIMAL PICTURES/BUTTERFLIES) Springtime is here, and along with the beautiful weather it brings...butterflies! Feast your eyes on this photo gallery of amazing winged beauties--from the most common to the rarest of butterfly species. These wonderful photos are sure to make you float like a butterfly, or at least stop and smell the roses! — Global Animal

How To Make Your Windows Bird-Proof

(BIRDS/CONSERVATION) Millions of birds die every year because of accidental collisions with glass doors and windows. Thankfully there are many ways of safeguarding birds from such tragedy, i.e. window alerts. Many have also found interest in a new product called the My Spy Birdhouse. Continue reading for more on this innovative birdhouse and other tips on how to make your windows bird proof.  — Global Animal
birds, endangered species, endangered animals, blue footed booby, galapagos islands, livescience

Is The Blue Footed Booby A Gone Goose?

(BIRDS/ENDANGERED SPECIES) ECUADOR — Blue-footed boobies are a type of seabird native to the Galápagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador. Their distinctive bright blue feet make them hard to miss among the rocky terrain. However, their population is slowly declining. Scientists speculate this may be due to the decrease in availability of sardines, which are the birds' primary food source. Read the full article below for more details on the news. — Global Animal

Waterfowl, avian birds, grebe, hydrotherapy, rehabilitation efforts, animal welfare

The Sky’s The Limit: Center Channels Creativity To Save Wildlife

New rehabilitation efforts are being made for animals at an animal care facility in Massachusetts.  Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Mass. has begun using what they are referring to as a hydrotherapy pool, which was built by its' staff and volunteers. The pool is currently being used for seabirds and waterfowl; the pool was created to help remove contaminate, speed-up water proofing, and release stress by using a constant stream of cleansed water.

Cams Give Eagle Eye View Of Live Nesting

(BIRDS/ANIMAL SCIENCE) Five bald eagle cameras have been set up across the country to live-stream the peak of their nesting season. Viewers can watch as eaglets hatch, feed, and develop over time. If you're lucky, you might even see them take off for their first flight! Eagle cams have been in use for several years, but recently exploded in popularity. Highly valued in the scientific community, the cams spread awareness about conservation to the general public and help with biological and behavioral research. Read the full article below for more on eagle cams, the history of the bald eagle's plight, and to view the five live-stream feeds for yourself. — Global Animal

Vultures: Nature’s Garbage Men

(BIRDS/VULTURES) Often ridiculed for being ugly and smelly, vultures undoubtedly get a bad rap. Eagles get the glory of being national emblems and symbols of war, and doves are admired for their beauty and symbolize peace. Meanwhile, vultures—like garbage men—play a very important role in nature and human society. — Global Animal

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