(RHINOS/WILDLIFE CONSERVATION) In the 1980s, there were estimated to be 800 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild. Nowadays, that number could be as low as 30–no thanks to poaching and habitat loss.

But since these four known wild rhino populations are so segregated from one another, they also have difficulty reaching each other to breed. The situation has become so dire, conservationists will need to start capturing wild Sumatran rhinos to breed them and boost the species’ captive population.

Read on to learn more about how we can save this species from extinction. — Global Animal

Fewer than 100 Sumatran rhinos remain in the wild. Photo Credit: World Wild Life Foundation
New estimates suggest that fewer than 100 Sumatran rhinos remain in the wild. Photo Credit: World Wild Life Foundation

The DoDo, Sarah V Schweig

No one knows exactly how many rare Sumatran rhinos are left in the wild, but new estimates suggest the population is as low as 30. The best-case scenario? Just under 100. And there are just nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity.

These are bleak estimates, especially since if the Sumatran rhino dies off, that will be the end of the entire genus.

“The Sumatran rhino doesn’t just represent a single species – it is the last survivor in its genus, which has been separated from other living rhinos for around 25 million years,” Jeremy Hance, a wildlife journalist, told The Dodo. Hance has just published a four-part series on the critically endangered animal, “Is Anyone Going to Save the Sumatran Rhino?” at Mongabay. “It’s a living relic to a lost past. It’s also a direct relative of the extinct woolly rhino — how cool is that?”

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