(ZOOS) FLORIDA — Zookeeper Stacey Konwiser died April 15 after being attacked by a Malayan tiger inside a secured portion of the tiger enclosure at the Palm Beach Zoo. The 13-year-old male tiger delivered a fatal neck injury after Konwiser entered an enclosure known as the night house, not visible to the public, where the tigers eat and sleep.

However, the zoo is not placing blame on the tiger in the deadly attack. Officials claim Konwiser violated the zoo’s safety protocol which states employees are never allowed to enter a tiger enclosure to which the animal has access.

The rare Malayan tiger was tranquilized during the incident and remains at the zoo. While zoo officials have received criticism for not shooting the tiger, they stand by their decision to tranquilize the critically endangered species.

If you’re familiar with the film Blackfish, then you’re probably aware of the dangerous psychological repercussions that can result from wild animals’ unnatural imprisonment. Is this another example of when animals in captivity revolt, or a case of “you break the rules, you pay the price?” Read on to learn more about the horrifying incident and share your thoughts in the comments below. — Global Animal

A Malayan tiger killed Stacey Konwise at Palm Beach Zoo. Photo Credit: REX via Telegraph
A Malayan tiger killed zookeeper Stacey Konwiser at the Palm Beach Zoo April 15, 2016. Photo Credit: REX via Telegraph

CNN, Faith Karimi and Amy La Porte

A keeper killed by a tiger at a Florida zoo this month broke the rules when she entered the big cat’s enclosure, zoo officials said.

Stacey Konwiser, 38, died April 15 after a 13-year-old male Malayan tiger delivered a fatal neck injury inside a secured portion of the tiger area.

But questions still remain about the circumstances surrounding the death of the lead tiger keeper at the Palm Beach Zoo.

The day of the attack, the zoo’s spokeswoman said Konwiser had “absolutely” not done anything out of the ordinary when she entered the area where tigers eat and sleep.

“This was part of a daily procedure that takes place, this was something that was done every single day. She was efficient and proficient in doing this task and an unfortunate situation occurred,” Naki Carter said.

But in a statement released Friday, a week after her death, Andrew Aiken, the zoo’s president, said Konwiser had violated zoo policy.

She “entered that same portion of the night house after it was clearly designated as accessible by a tiger,” Aiken said.

“Under Palm Beach Zoo policy, zoo employees are never allowed to enter a tiger enclosure to which the animal has access.”

Stacey Konwiser, a zookeeper at the Palm Beach Zoo died today after an incident with a Malaysian tiger at the zoo in West Palm Beach, Florida. Photo Credit: NBC News
Stacey Konwiser, a zookeeper at the Palm Beach Zoo died today after an incident with a Malaysian tiger at the zoo in West Palm Beach, Florida. Photo Credit: NBC News

Death ‘no mystery’

“There is absolutely no mystery as to how Stacey Konwiser died,” according to a statement posted in a new FAQ section on the Palm Beach Zoo’s website.

“The question is: why did a deeply talented and experienced zookeeper, fully aware of the presence of a tiger and knowledgeable of our safety protocols, enter a tiger enclosure into which a tiger had access?” it said.

The statement also clarified that although the night house has video surveillance cameras, they were not recording at the time, and are only activated when the zoo has newborn tiger cubs.

“Why or how this could possibly occur is the subject of five ongoing investigations, including our own,” Aiken said in his statement.

The zoo said the afternoon that Konwiser entered the enclosure, she was alone, which is in compliance with the nationalized standards from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums.

CNN’s attempts to reach the zoo for further comments were not immediately successful.

Stacey Konwiser with her husband, Jeremy Konwiser. Photo Credit: http://fox13now.com/
Stacey Konwiser with her husband, Jeremy Konwiser. Photo Credit: http://fox13now.com/

No guarantee ‘cat won’t kill you’

Dave Salmoni, a large predator expert and TV host for Animal Planet, said “there is no way to ever guarantee that a cat won’t kill you.”

“Almost never would you allow a keeper to have access to a dangerous predator … If she’s given these keys then she has a history of perfect gate-locking procedure,” he added.

Konwiser had worked at the zoo for three years and was “very experienced” with tigers, zoo officials said.

Salmoni said no matter the relationship between Konwiser and the tiger, once she entered that enclosure, “if this was something unusual, the tiger would have looked at her like a ball of yarn to play with.”

“Once she started to struggle or moved quickly, that tiger’s primal hunter instinct would have then come into play,” he said.

Threats against tiger

The rare tiger, one of four at the facility, is held in a contained area where the animals are fed and sleep.

The male tiger was tranquilized after the attack and remains at the facility. Zoo officials have declined to provide information on the tiger, including its name.

“Identifying the animal only serves to stigmatize and potentially places the tiger in harm’s way,” the zoo said in a statement posted on its Facebook page. It said it has received threats against the animal.

Zoo officials have said the tiger was off-exhibit at the time and no guests saw what happened.

Recent attacks by big cats in captivity

  • In January, a keeper was severely injured at an Australian zoo founded by the late wildlife conservationist Steve Irwin.
  • Last September, a keeper was attacked and killed by a Sumatran tiger at a zoo in Hamilton, New Zealand.
  • In June 2015, police shot and killed a white tiger that killed a man in Tbilisi, Georgia, after severe flooding allowed hundreds of wild animals to escape the city zoo.
  • In 2013, a 24-year-old woman working at a Northern California animal sanctuary was mauled and killed by a lion.
  • In 2007, an escaped Siberian tiger attacked and killed one zoo patron and injured two others in a cafe at the San Francisco Zoo.
  • In 2003, a white tiger attacked Roy Horn of Siegfried and Roy during a performance in Las Vegas. The tiger lunged at Horn’s neck about halfway through the show and dragged him off stage as audience members watched.

More CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/23/us/florida-zookeeper-killed-violated-policy/index.html

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