(ANIMAL RESEARCH) Major federal agencies are taking significant steps this month in response to the nearly 30-year-old campaign to end invasive experimentation on chimpanzees. With the influence of Dr. Jane Goodall and a number of animal welfare groups, Dr. Francis S. Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has announced that over 300 of the 360 chimps owned by the NIH will be phased out and retired to sanctuaries over the next few years. This decision follows the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposal to list all chimps—including those in captivity—as endangered species, further restricting chimp experimentation. However, while these are definitely reasons to celebrate, not all of the chimps will be retired. And while some of the retired NIH chimps are already arriving at sanctuaries, others held in private labs face an uncertain future. This being said, activists maintain this is not the end of their efforts to protect chimps. Continue reading at the links below to learn more about the ongoing campaign and watch the video, “Retired From Research,” below. — Global Animal
Photo Credit: Save the Chimps
More than 300 of the 360 research chimps owned by the NIH will be retired to sanctuaries over the next few years. Photo Credit: Save the Chimps

The New York Times, James Gorman

Read the New York Times article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/09/science/unlikely-partners-freeing-chimps-from-the-lab.html?hp

Watch the video, “Retired From Research,” below.

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