(ANIMAL NEWS) Facebook announced that it will no longer feature puppy mill ads on its online Marketplace. The change is in response to the ASPCA’s campaign to raise awareness of puppy mills and warn people against buying animals from pet stores, many of which are unhealthy and kept in unsanitary conditions without any form of socialization. Read more on the new partnership between Facebook and the ASPCA, and the potential positive impact this could have on the ban of puppy mill sales for all online retailers and classified listings. — Global Animal
Field Investigations and Response Team Senior Director Tim Rickey with victims from a MS puppy mill raid. Photo Credit: ASPCA

Care2, Alicia Graef

In response to concerns brought by the ASPCA, actions are now being taken to ensure that puppy mill puppies will no longer be listed or sold through Facebook’s Marketplace.

Unfortunately, many of the ads placed online are from puppy mills, where dogs are kept at large-scale commercial facilities in filthy conditions without even the most basic care or socialization. The partnership between the ASPCA, Facebook and Marketplace partner Oodle came about as part of the ASPCA’s No Pet Store Puppies campaign, which is intended to raise awareness of puppy mills and encourage people to adopt and avoid pet stores that sell animals.

“Removing an online platform for the cruel puppy mill industry sets a positive example of corporate citizenship and will help improve the lives of countless dogs,” said ASPCA President and CEO Ed Sayres. “Most consumers are unaware they are perpetuating animal cruelty by purchasing a puppy online, and given the visibility of Marketplace on Facebook, this move has the potential to raise critical awareness about unscrupulous online breeders.”

Breeders who sell directly to the public are also exempt from regulations that require them to be licensed and inspected by the USDA, allowing breeders who use online transactions to operate without any oversight, which means that not only will puppies continue to be mass produced, but that adult dogs in these facilities are condemned to a lives in cages as breeding machines.

“Consumers who purchase a puppy from a website run the risk of acquiring an unhealthy animal and often end up with expensive vet bills and broken hearts,” said Cori Menkin, Senior Director of the ASPCA Puppy Mills Campaign. “We hope additional online retailers and classifieds listings will follow this example and stop providing a platform for puppy mill sales.”

The process to remove puppy mill ads has already started and more than 10,000 have reportedly already been taken down. Ads from rescues and shelters that require adoption and rehoming fees will still be welcome on the site.

Visit the ASPCA’s No Pet Store Puppies campaign for more information on commercial dog breeding and alternatives.

Thanks to the 1,535 Care2 members who signed the petition against puppy mill ads on Facebook! 

Read more Care2: http://www.care2.com/causes/facebook-bans-puppy-mill-ads.html#ixzz1qXUMtGQs

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2 COMMENTS

  1. This is really great news. Kudos to the ASPCA for making this happen. Now what do we do about FB pages that profile pet stores and online brokers/sellers of what are clearly puppy mill dogs? This has to stop too. There are lots of us willing to help and lend our support.