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All about birds: News, Stories, Facts & Science

Waterfowl, avian birds, grebe, hydrotherapy, rehabilitation efforts, animal welfare

The Sky’s The Limit: Center Channels Creativity To Save Wildlife

New rehabilitation efforts are being made for animals at an animal care facility in Massachusetts.  Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Mass. has begun using what they are referring to as a hydrotherapy pool, which was built by its’ staff and volunteers. The pool is currently being used for seabirds and waterfowl; the pool was created to help remove contaminate, speed-up water proofing, and release stress by using a constant stream of cleansed water.

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Cams Give Eagle Eye View Of Live Nesting

(BIRDS/ANIMAL SCIENCE) Five bald eagle cameras have been set up across the country to live-stream the peak of their nesting season. Viewers can watch as eaglets hatch, feed, and develop over time. If you’re lucky, you might even see them take off for their first flight! Eagle cams have been in use for several years, but recently exploded in popularity. Highly valued in the scientific community, the cams spread awareness about conservation to the general public and help with biological and behavioral research. Read the full article below for more on eagle cams, the history of the bald eagle’s plight, and to view the five live-stream feeds for yourself. — Global Animal

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Vultures: Nature’s Garbage Men

(BIRDS/VULTURES) Often ridiculed for being ugly and smelly, vultures undoubtedly get a bad rap. Eagles get the glory of being national emblems and symbols of war, and doves are admired for their beauty and symbolize peace. Meanwhile, vultures—like garbage men—play a very important role in nature and human society. — Global Animal

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Birds flying in the sky, fly in a V to save energy.

Why A ‘V’ Formation Is For The Birds

(BIRDS/ANIMAL NEWS) Everyone’s familiar with the V formation that birds fly in when they travel, but do you know why they choose to fly in a V? Scientists from the Royal Veterinary College in London conducted a study published in the international journal, Nature, and concluded that the V formation is an energy saving way for birds to travel. Continue reading below to find out how birds save energy by flying in a V. — Global Animal

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snowy owl, white owl, owls, birds, animals, rare animals, harry potter

Snowy Owls Make Southern Debut

(OWLS/BIRDS) Snowy owls are native to Arctic regions, and thus are never really spotted past the southern border of Canada. This year, however, the white owls have been spotted much farther south. Residents in Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, and Kansas have already reported sightings. The snowy creatures’ migration rarely includes the United States, so seeing an owl this season truly is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. To discover why the white owls are flying so far out of their usual path, and for tips about where to find them, read the full article below. — Global Animal

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Alaskan North American Endangered Bird Bald Eagle

See A Bird’s Eye View Of Flying Like An Eagle

(BIRDS/SKIES) GoPro has quickly become the world’s most versatile camera, allowing for an infinite amount of creativity in the photography and video production worlds. In terms of the animal kingdom, GoPro has enabled personal encounters with creatures through video capability. These unique and captivating videos allow us to see things we could previously only dream of experiencing. A few months ago, a trainer in the French Alps decided to strap his own GoPro to the back of a bald eagle. His video has become immensely popular because of what it depicts—a literal bird’s eye view as we follow the bird’s flight through the skies. Read on for some fun facts about the North American bald eagle and see the GoPro video for yourself! — Global Animal

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Condors Rejoice! California Bans Lead Ammunition

(WILDLIFE/ENDANGERED SPECIES) California is leading the way for wildlife recovery by becoming the first state to require that all hunting ammunition be lead-free. On October 11th, Gov. Jerry Brown signed the ban in response to documented studies and repeated requests by environmental groups to protect the highly endangered California condors, as well as other birds and wildlife, who are killed every year from direct and secondary lead poisoning. Lead ammunition is devastating to animal life, especially for scavengers like the condor, who are at huge risk by consuming hunted carcasses. Environmentalists are hoping that the ban in California could encourage other states to pass similar laws. In a 2012 study conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, researchers found that almost 70 percent of condor deaths were the result of lead poisoning. With only 400 birds left in existence, eliminating lead-based ammunition is a huge step in the right direction for potentially stabilizing, or even dramatically increasing California condor populations. Read on for more information on the bill, lead poisoning, as well as arguments brought forth by hunters and other opponents. — Global Animal

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A Calcified Flamingo. Photo Credit: Nick Brandt (ANIMAL PICTURES)

World’s Deadliest Lake Mummifies Animals

(ANIMAL SCIENCE/ANIMAL WELFARE) Photographer Nick Brandt recently traveled to the world’s deadliest lake, Lake Natron in Northern Tanzania, and discovered a shocking collection of perfectly mummified animal remains. Upon full submersion into the lake, the animals are instantly calcified and perfectly preserved. Take a look at the following photos and read the article below to learn more about Lake Natron’s unique properties, the animals who have fallen victim to it’s depths, and the few that can actually survive it’s deadly waters. — Global Animal

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